top of page
Capture
chemistry
HPC-bg-2.jpg

Key Properties of Sodium Cyanate (88% - 92% )

Chemical Composition: Sodium cyanate is the sodium salt of cyanic acid (HCNO). Its molecular structure consists of a sodium cation (Na+) bonded to a cyanate anion (OCN-).

Crystalline Structure: Sodium cyanate forms as a white, odorless, and crystalline solid. It is highly soluble in water, which makes it easily adaptable for various chemical reactions.

ALSO
KNOWN AS

​CYANIC ACID, NATRIUMCYANAT, CIANATO DE SODIO,

AND CYANATE DE SODIUM

APPLICATIONS

Chemical Synthesis: Sodium cyanate is a versatile reagent in chemical laboratories. It is often employed in the synthesis of organic compounds, including ureas and various derivatives. These reactions are fundamental in the production of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and plastics.

Agriculture: In agriculture, sodium cyanate is used as a soil treatment to enhance the availability of essential nutrients like phosphorus. It reacts with phosphates in the soil to form more soluble compounds, facilitating nutrient uptake by plants. Metal Surface Treatment: Sodium cyanate is utilized in metalworking processes, where it serves as a heat treatment agent for carburizing steel surfaces. This enhances the hardness and wear resistance of the treated metal.

Photography: Historically, sodium cyanate played a role in photographic processes, particularly in the development of photosensitive materials. While digital photography has largely replaced traditional methods, sodium cyanate remains a part of photographic history.

NOTES

Store in cool place. Keep container tightly closed in a dry and well-ventilated place. Store away from strong
oxidizing agents.

Literature References

R. Badera,; D.J. Dupréa,; F. Schitz. The preparation of pure sodium cyanate from urea. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. 1948, 2
543-548.

Gavin Chit Tsui et. al. Expedient synthesis of chiral oxazolidinone scaffolds via thodium-catalyzed asymmetric ring-opening with
sodium cyanate. Organic Letters. 2013, 15 (5),1064-1067.

SODIUM CYANATE NUCLEOPHILIC POWERHOUSE AND ITS KEY ROLE IN STEREOSPECIFIC REACTIONS AND MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY.

Sodium cyanate is an ideal nucleophile, and these nucleophilic properties make it a major contributor to the stereospecificity in certain reactions such as in the production of chiral oxazolidone. Sodium cyanate is a useful reagent in producing asymmetrical urea that have a range of biological activity mostly in aryl isocyanate intermediates. Such intermediates as well as sodium cyanate have been used in medicine as a means of counterbalancing carcinogenic effects on the body. Notes Store in cool place. Keep container tightly closed in a dry and well-ventilated place. Store away from strong oxidizing agents.


Literature References
R. Badera,; D.J. Dupréa,; F. Schitz. The preparation of pure sodium cyanate from urea. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. 1948, 2
543-548.


Gavin Chit Tsui et. al. Expedient synthesis of chiral oxazolidinone scaffolds via thodium-catalyzed asymmetric ring-opening with
sodium cyanate. Organic Letters. 2013, 15 (5),1064-1067.

SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS

Sodium cyanate is an ideal nucleophile, and these nucleophilic properties make it a major contributor to the stereospecificity in certain reactions such as in the production of chiral oxazolidone. Sodium cyanate is a useful reagent in producing asymmetrical urea that have a range of biological activity mostly in aryl isocyanate intermediates. Such intermediates as well as sodium cyanate have been used in medicine as a means of counterbalancing carcinogenic effects on the body. Notes Store in cool place. Keep container tightly closed in a dry and well-ventilated place. Store away from strong oxidizing agents.


Literature References
R. Badera,; D.J. Dupréa,; F. Schitz. The preparation of pure sodium cyanate from urea. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. 1948, 2
543-548.


Gavin Chit Tsui et. al. Expedient synthesis of chiral oxazolidinone scaffolds via thodium-catalyzed asymmetric ring-opening with
sodium cyanate. Organic Letters. 2013, 15 (5),1064-1067.

GHS-pictogram-exclam.svg.png

HAZARDS

GHS LABELLING

warning
bottom of page